Calculadora de ciclismo FTP

FTP Calculator

FTP Calculator

Value, Methodology, and Science Behind the FTP Calculator

The FTP (Functional Threshold Power) Calculator is a tool designed to help cyclists and triathletes measure their current fitness level and plan their training more effectively. By inputting power data from a specific test, the calculator estimates the maximum power output a rider can sustain for an hour, known as FTP. This value can be used to determine specific training zones, optimize workouts, and improve performance.

Why Use the FTP Calculator?

  • Personalized Training: The calculator provides customized training zones based on your current power output, enabling more effective and targeted training sessions.
  • Performance Benchmarking: FTP serves as a reliable benchmark for gauging improvements in cycling fitness over time.
  • Race Strategy Planning: Understanding your FTP can help plan pacing strategies for race day, ensuring optimal performance without burning out too early.
  • Motivation and Goal Setting: Quantifying performance and setting measurable goals based on FTP can be highly motivating for athletes aiming to improve their race times.

Methodology and Science Behind the Calculator

FTP Concept

The concept of Functional Threshold Power (FTP) is analogous to the lactate threshold in running or swimming. It represents the highest power output a cyclist can sustain for an hour without experiencing a rapid build-up of lactate in the muscles, which would lead to fatigue. FTP is a crucial metric for endurance athletes as it determines the intensity of training zones.

Calculating FTP

To calculate FTP, cyclists can perform a 20-minute test or a ramp test:

  • 20-minute Test: The rider maintains the highest possible average power over 20 minutes. FTP is estimated as 95% of this average power.
  • Ramp Test: The rider performs increasingly harder intervals until exhaustion. FTP is estimated as 75% of the final 1-minute power.

Training Zones

Using the FTP value, we can define different training zones, each with a specific purpose in training:

  • Zone 1 (Active Recovery): Less than 55% of FTP. Used for recovery rides.
  • Zone 2 (Endurance): 56-75% of FTP. Builds aerobic endurance.
  • Zone 3 (Tempo): 76-90% of FTP. Improves sustainable power.
  • Zone 4 (Lactate Threshold): 91-105% of FTP. Increases the ability to sustain high power output.
  • Zone 5 (VO2 Max): 106-120% of FTP. Enhances aerobic capacity.
  • Zone 6 (Anaerobic Capacity): 121-150% of FTP. Improves high-intensity efforts.
  • Zone 7 (Neuromuscular Power): More than 150% of FTP. Boosts sprinting power.

Scientific Foundations

The methodology behind the FTP calculator is grounded in exercise physiology and the principles of endurance training. FTP correlates well with the anaerobic threshold, which is a crucial determinant of endurance performance. The concept is widely supported by scientific literature and practical coaching approaches.

References:

  • Training and Racing with a Power Meter: Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan have extensively covered FTP and its application in training programs. Their methodologies and training philosophies are a great resource for understanding FTP. Training and Racing with a Power Meter
  • The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: Various studies have validated the use of threshold-based training, similar to FTP, in improving endurance performance. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Test Protocols

Test Protocols

20-Minute FTP Test Protocol

Warm-up:

10 minutes easy spinning: Gradually increase your cadence and effort.

3 x 1-minute efforts: Ride at a high intensity (~100-110% of your estimated FTP) with 1-minute recovery between efforts.

5 minutes easy spinning: Recover and prepare mentally for the test.

The Test:

Start steadily: Begin the 20-minute test at a pace you believe you can sustain for the entire duration.

Maintain a consistent effort: Focus on maintaining a steady power output. Avoid starting too hard and fading.

Monitor your metrics: Keep an eye on your power and heart rate, but don't let them dictate your effort entirely. Go by feel as well.

Finish strong: In the final few minutes, if you have the energy, try to increase your effort slightly.

Cool-down:

10 minutes easy spinning: Gradually reduce your effort and allow your body to recover.

Ramp Test Protocol

Warm-up:

10 minutes easy spinning: Gradually increase your cadence and effort.

3 x 1-minute efforts: Ride at a high intensity (~100-110% of your estimated FTP) with 1-minute recovery between efforts.

5 minutes easy spinning: Recover and prepare mentally for the test.

The Test:

Start at a low intensity: Begin at a manageable power level (~50% of your estimated FTP).

Incrementally increase power: Increase the power output in small, regular increments (e.g., 20-30 watts every minute).

Continue until failure: Ride until you reach a point where you cannot maintain the power output for the full minute.

Monitor your metrics: Focus on maintaining smooth pedaling and breathing. Keep an eye on your power and heart rate.

Cool-down:

10 minutes easy spinning: Gradually reduce your effort and allow your body to recover.